Spring 2019
Sociology 306
Monday/Wednesday: 2:30pm – 4:20pm

Office: O’Connor 336
Office Hours: Mon/Wed 10:30 – 12:30 or by appointment
Phone: (508) 626-4864
E-mail: isilver@framingham.edu

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course explores the significant work nonprofit organizations do to address social problems. Students decide how to donate funds to local nonprofit organizations working to expand access to opportunity for low-income communities. They assess specific organizations’ merits for funding by evaluating grant proposals and doing site visits to get a firsthand glimpse of how these organizations accomplish their goals. Students also do fundraising to expand their capacity to help people in need.

READINGS:

There is one book to purchase, which you can buy from the university bookstore or at the link below:

Ira Silver, Giving Hope: How You Can Restore the American Dream. CreateSpace, 2013.

All other readings are linked below on the syllabus.

*Please bring assigned readings to class. For those that are online, either print them or access them electronically in class via your laptop, tablet, or smartphone.

ATTENDANCE:

I understand sometimes there are justifiable reasons for missing a class, but if you miss more than two it will affect your grade. If you have to be absent, please let me know. There is no need to give me a doctor’s note. It is your responsibility to catch up on material you missed.

*On the dates indicated below, you MUST take part in site visits to organizations under consideration for funding. These trips will extend beyond our regular class time.

Wednesday, March 13th
Monday, April  22nd

Wednesday, April 24th
Monday, April 29th

GRADING:

Your final grade will be based on the following:

20%        Oral presentations (10% each)
20%        Grant evaluations posted on Blackboard
20%        Reflective paper
10%        Blog post
10%        Rewritten grant proposal
15%        Class attendance and participation
5%          Grant ceremony attendance and participation

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Given the Sociology Department’s commitment to maintaining the highest academic standards, students should be aware of the University’s policies concerning academic honesty, which are stated in the undergraduate catalog: “Integrity is essential to academic life. Consequently, students who enroll at Framingham State University agree to maintain high standards of academic honesty and scholarly practice. They shall be responsible for familiarizing themselves with the published policies and procedures regarding academic honesty.” Infractions include plagiarism, cheating on exams and quizzes, unauthorized collaboration with other students, and submitting work in more than one course for academic credit without prior approval of the instructor. The FSU Catalog defines plagiarism as “claiming as one’s own work the published or unpublished literal or paraphrased work of another.” Penalties for academic dishonesty may include receiving a failing grade for the course, academic suspension, and dismissal from the University.

NOTICE OF NON-DISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY:

By taking this class, you agree to abide by Framingham State University’s policy of non-discrimination and equal opportunity. The University is dedicated to providing educational, working, and living environments that value the diverse backgrounds of all people. The Massachusetts Civil Rights Act (“MCRA,” M.G.L. c. 12, §§ 11H11I11J) protects the rights of all residents of and visitors to Massachusetts to be free from bias-motivated threats, intimidation, and coercion that interfere with their civil rights. The MCRA protects the right to attend school, live peacefully, and enjoy other basic rights.

SCHEDULE

Wednesday, January 23rd

*Course Overview

Monday, January 28th

*Read: Claire Gaudiani, “Philanthropy: Investing in America’s Freedom and Progress.” USA Today, July 2005.

Wednesday, January 30th

*Read: Opportunity for Few: The Withering of the American Dream

Monday, February 4th

*Read: Dorian O. Burton & Brian C.B. Barnes, “Shifting Philanthropy From Charity to Justice.” Stanford Social Innovation Review, January 3, 2017.

*Read: Peter Buffett, “The Charitable-Industrial Complex.” New York Times, July 26, 2013.

*Read in class: Gwendolyn Brooks, “The Lovers of the Poor”

Wednesday, February 6th

*Read: Ira Silver, Chapters 4 and 5 in Giving Hope: How You Can Restore the American Dream. This is the book required for purchase.

Monday, February 11th

We will begin to create our RFP (Request for Proposals) and start to formulate specific fundraising plans.

Tuesday, February 12th

*Due by 10am – Email me a list of 4 nonprofits you are interested in researching for your oral presentations.

Wednesday, February 13th

*Read: Ira Silver, Chapters 6-7 in Giving Hope: How You Can Restore the American Dream. This is the book required for purchase.

*GUEST:  Will Charnley, Learning by Giving Foundation

Monday, February 18th

*NO CLASS – Presidents’ Day

Wednesday, February 20th

*Read: Sample grant applications from prior years:
– Smart From The Start (2014)
– Worcester Youth Center (2015)
– Beacon Academy (2016)
– End Mass Overdose (2018)

*WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT DUE ON BLACKBOARD – Write 1 paragraph about each of the sample grant applications. Discuss what you find strong or not so strong in the application.

*Professor Coyne’s Grant Writing students will be joining us today.

Monday, February 25th

*We will discuss how to give an effective pitch and then begin to make concrete plans for our upcoming fundraisers.

*GUEST:  Audrey Kali, Communication Arts Department

Wednesday, February 27th

*Come prepared to give your first pitch about potential grant applicants…Here’s the list of who’s pitching which NPOs.

Monday, March 4th

Snow day

Wednesday, March 6th

*Come prepared to give your second pitch.

Monday, March 11th

*Due by 7am – Email me up to 25 choices of organizations you’d like to invite to apply for funding. Send me only the number of the organization.

*We will determine our invitation list, finish the RFP, and work on fundraising.

Tuesday, March 12th

*Due by Noon – Email the organization you’ve been assigned from the list of nonprofits we’re inviting to apply for funds (with a copy of the email sent to me). Give your message a brief and catchy title (e.g. “Invitation”, “Grant Opportunity”, or “$10,000”) In the text box, paste the letter of invitation and attach the RFP as a separate document. To be eligible for funding, organizations must submit applications by 5pm on Thursday, March 28th.

Wednesday, March 13th

*Site visit to Future Chefs (***Meet in front of May Hall at 1:35)

*Assignment: Bring 3 or more written questions that you would like to ask about the organization and its work based on Chapter 5 from Giving Hope and reading through their website.

*** SPRING BREAK ***

Monday, March 25th

*GUESTS: Students from last year’s Nonprofit Giving class

*Assignment: Bring 2 or more written questions that you would like to ask these former students about their experiences last year and how you can get the most out of the rest of the course.

Wednesday, March 27th

*GUESTS:
Amy Kingman and Shanna O’Berry – Learning by Giving Foundation
Lisa Goldblatt-Grace – My Life, My Choice

*Read: “Jody Bennenson, David Campbell, and Lindsey McDougal, “Learning by Giving: How Today’s Students Can Become Tomorrow’s Philanthropists.” The Conversation, November 26, 2017.

*Read: My Life, My Choice website

*Assignment: Bring 2 or more written questions (one each) that you would like to ask our guests about experiential philanthropy (Learning by Giving Foundation) and about philanthropic responses to human trafficking (My Life, My Choice).

Friday, March 29th

*WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT DUE VIA EMAIL: Revised grant proposal

Monday, April 1st

*Read: Grant applications, group, 1

*WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT DUE ON BLACKBOARD – Write 1-2 paragraphs for each of the following organizations. Discuss in detail what you find strong or not so strong in their materials according to the criteria in our RFP.

Wednesday, April 3rd

*Read: Grant applications, group, 2

*WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT DUE ON BLACKBOARD – Write 1-2 paragraphs for each of the following organizations. Discuss in detail what you find strong or not so strong in their materials according to the criteria in our RFP.

Monday, April 8th

*Read: Grant applications, group, 3

*WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT DUE ON BLACKBOARD – Write 1-2 paragraphs for each of the following organizations. Discuss in detail what you find strong or not so strong in their materials according to the criteria in our RFP.

Wednesday, April 10th

*Read: Grant applications, group, 4

*WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT DUE ON BLACKBOARD – Write 1-2 paragraphs for each of the following organizations. Discuss in detail what you find strong or not so strong in their materials according to the criteria in our RFP.

Monday, April 15th

NO CLASS – Patriots’ Day

Wednesday, April 17th

*Due by 10am – Email me your ranking (with 1 being the highest) of the nonprofits still under consideration for funding.

*Watch in class“Nonprofit Site Visits”

Monday, April 22nd

*Site visit – Bring 3 or more written questions that you would like to ask about the organization and its work.

Wednesday, April 24th

*Site visit – Bring 3 or more written questions that you would like to ask about the organization and its work.

Monday, April 29th

*Site visit – Bring 3 or more written questions that you would like to ask about the organization and its work.

Wednesday, May 1st

*WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT DUE ON BLACKBOARD – Write 6 paragraphs (2 for each of the organizations we site visited). One paragraph should discuss the organization’s merits for funding based on the criteria in the RFP and other should discuss your reservations about funding the organization based on these same criteria.

Monday, May 6th

*Make grant decision and discuss grant ceremony

Wednesday, May 8th

*Course wrap-up

Friday, May 10th

*WRITTEN ASSIGNMENT DUE VIA EMAIL: Reflective paper

Wednesday, May 15th

*11:30am – Grant ceremony: McCarthy Center Forum